Law

Bankruptcy Law - Legal Advice, Legal Help, Legal Aid - Free Legal Help

Bankruptcy is a legally declared inability or impairment of ability of an individual or organizations to pay their creditors. Creditors may file a bankruptcy petition against a debtor ("involuntary bankruptcy") in an effort to recoup a portion of what they are owed. In the majority of cases, however, bankruptcy is initiated by the debtor (a "voluntary bankruptcy" that is filed by the bankrupt individual or organization).

Bankruptcy in the United States is a matter placed under Federal jurisdiction by the United States Constitution (in Article 1, Section 8, Clause 4), which allows Congress to enact "uniform laws on the subject of bankruptcies throughout the United States." Its implementation, however, is found in statute law. The relevant statutes are incorporated within the Bankruptcy Code, located at Title 11 of the United States Code, and amplified by state law in the many places where Federal law either fails to speak or expressly defers to state law.

While bankruptcy cases are always filed in United States Bankruptcy Court (an adjunct to the U.S. District Courts), bankruptcy cases, particularly with respect to the validity of claims and exemptions, are often highly dependent upon State law. State law therefore plays a major role in many bankruptcy cases, and it is often not possible to generalize bankruptcy law across state lines.


Chapters
There are six types of bankruptcy under the Bankruptcy Code, located at Title 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code:

Chapter 7 Bankruptcy: basic liquidation for individuals and businesses;
Chapter 9 Bankruptcy: municipal bankruptcy;
Chapter 11 Bankruptcy: rehabilitation or reorganization, used primarily by business debtors, but sometimes by individuals with substantial debts and assets;
Chapter 12 Bankruptcy: rehabilitation for family farmers and fishermen;
Chapter 13 Bankruptcy: rehabilitation with a payment plan for individuals with a regular source of income;
Chapter 15 Bankruptcy: ancillary and other international cases.
The most common types of personal bankruptcy for individuals are Chapter 7 Bankruptcy and Chapter 13 Bankruptcy. (As much as 65% of all U.S. consumer bankruptcy filings are of the Chapter 7 Bankruptcy variety.[4]) Corporations and other business Bankruptcy forms often file under Chapter 7 Bankruptcy or Chapter 11 Bankruptcy.

In Chapter 7 Bankruptcy, a debtor surrenders his or her non-exempt property to a bankruptcy trustee who then liquidates the property and distributes the proceeds to the debtor's unsecured creditors. In exchange, the debtor is entitled to a discharge of some debt; however, the debtor will not be granted a discharge if he or she is guilty of certain types of inappropriate behavior (e.g. concealing records relating to financial condition) and certain debts (e.g. spousal and child support, student loans, some taxes) will not be discharged even though the debtor is generally discharged from his or her debt. Many individuals in financial distress own only exempt property (e.g. clothes, household goods, an older car) and will not have to surrender any property to the trustee. The amount of property that a debtor may exempt varies from state to state. Chapter 7 Bankruptcy relief is available only once in any eight year period. Generally, the rights of secured creditors to their collateral continues even though their debt is discharged. For example, absent some arrangement by a debtor to surrender a car or "reaffirm" a debt, the creditor with a security interest in the debtor's car may repossess the car even if the debt to the creditor is discharged.

In Chapter 13 Bankruptcy, the debtor retains ownership and possession of all of his or her assets, but must devote some portion of his or her future income to repaying creditors, generally over a period of three to five years. The amount of payment and the period of the repayment plan depend upon a variety of factors, including the value of the debtor's property and the amount of a debtor's income and expenses. Secured creditors may be entitled to greater payment than unsecured creditors.

In Chapter 11 Bankruptcy, the debtor retains ownership and control of its assets and is retermed a debtor in possession ("DIP"). The debtor in possession runs the day to day operations of the business while creditors and the debtor work with the Bankruptcy Court in order to negotiate and complete a plan. Upon meeting certain requirements (e.g. fairness among creditors, priority of certain creditors) creditors are permitted to vote on the proposed plan. If a plan is confirmed the debtor will continue to operate and pay its debts under the terms of the confirmed plan. If a specified majority of creditors do not vote to confirm a plan, additional requirements may be imposed by the court in order to confirm the plan.